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30 Day Letter Writing Challenge: Day Thirteen- Someone you wish could forgive you

I really haven’t had that many awful, giant, you-hurt-me-so-bad-I’ll-never-forget-it fights. And for the one I did have, I don’t really care if I’m forgiven or not. It was five years ago, I don’t give a damn anymore. I suppose that comes with being rather reclusive.

posted 1 hour ago


thetwogaydetectives:

Many people say “oh, if John is bisexual, then why doesn’t he just say it?” Well, there are actually many reasons for him not saying anything.

He is, first of all, a closeted bisexual. We saw it since ASiP. They showed us that he was attracted to both genders, but that…


manybodies:

lightspeedsound:

lunapics:

theshells:

I can’t stop laughing at Harry running the fuck awaythe boy who lived ladies and gentlemen.

….You realize, of course, that Hermione Granger lit a teacher on fire when she was eleven, and kept a person alive in a jar for a year when she was fourteen, and studies dark and forbidden magics for kicks, and is one of the brightest and strongest witches of her era. If she came at me, even wandless, I would aparate to Neptune to get away from her.

Hermione Granger also: 

  • punched Draco Malfoy in the nose for being an idiot 
  • purposefully performed a confundus charm on whatshsface WHILE HE WAS FLYING just so Ron would win (omfg that is so fucking dangerous) 
  • literally pulled a fucking Bourne Identity on her parents and managed to set them up in fucking Australia (jesus christ she literally made it so that she NEVER EXISTED wtf that’s so fucking 007)
  • Convinced the Ministry of Magic to give her an incredibly dangerous and volatile device that allowed her to ALTER TIMELINES COMPLETELY (just because she was so smart, literally, that is the reason, her “potential”) 
  • Has enough basic survival skills and badass magic to literally disappear to the middle of nowhere and flourish AND figure out Voldemort’s plot with Harry 
  • Hermione also figures out not only what Voldemort’s plan is, but generally how to beat it, WAY BEFORE VOLDEMORT EVER DOES. Why? because she is just that much smarter and better at magic than everybody else

in conclusion: Voldemort wishes he could be as awesome as Hermione, that’s why he wants to kill her so bad. 

Can we rehave this series with hermione as the protagonist. 




"Short version: Not dead.”

"Short version: Not dead.”


30 Day Letter Writing Challenge: Day Twelve- The person who caused you a lot of pain

Fortunately for me, I really haven’t had that much pain caused. Besides my rather unfortunate situation with my parents, in which things they say hurt me but they don’t understand that they do or, if I happen to say something, why.

I’m just going to leave this one at that.

posted 1 day ago

"I love the rain. I love how it softens the outlines of things. The world becomes softly blurred, and I feel like I melt right into it."
— Hanamoto Hagumi, from Honey and Clover (via violentwavesofemotion)

miz-joely:

(Submitted by blink)

miz-joely:

(Submitted by blink)


brook:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

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this is the happiest thing i’ve ever seen



All of time and space, everywhere and anywhere, every star that ever was. Where do you want to start?

All of time and space, everywhere and anywhere, every star that ever was. Where do you want to start?


30 Day Letter Writing Challenge: Day Eleven- A deceased person

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,

I know you probably hate these words, but thank you for creating Sherlock Holmes. The character and stories have had a profound impact on my life today, and I’m not sure how different it would be had I never picked up a copy of Sherlock Holmes.

The first time I read a Sherlock Holmes adventure predates a time when I watched Sherlock or Elementary. I’d always heard references to the character, and I was on a “read-the-classics” kick. Sherlock Holmes was one among others such as Jane Eyre and Peter Pan. So one of the first days of summer vacation before ninth grade, I walked into the bookstore with my mother, picked up a copy of volume one of the Barnes and Nobel Classics editions. My mom ordered coffee from the in-store Starbucks, and I settled down to read while she did some work on her tablet. From the first story, I was hooked. I carried the thick volume around with me all summer, from piano lessons to road trips to pool parties.

I remember one particular event at a pool party. An older boy there, going into his third year of high school at one of the harder private schools, looked at the copy in my hands and said, “Oh. Do you have to read a few of those stories for school, too?” I remember being shocked, because Sherlock Holmes was my pleasure reading, while my assigned readings for school were a mind-numbingly dull book about an Indian boy coming of age and Of Mice and Men, each with a dialectical journal with twenty entries. Sherlock Holmes, at least, was exciting, with the great problems and stunning deductions from Holmes.

I stopped reading once I reached the Final Problem, putting the book down and refusing to believe that the detective was dead. It wasn’t until the last quarter of my second year of high school, when my psychology teacher showed the first episode of Sherlock to the class, that my love for the stories was reawakened. I went back to the book that had laid abandoned on my bookshelf for a year and a half and devoured it once more, picking up on more of Holmes’s wit and humor as I re-read it, now a more mature and analytic reader. 

Today, I’ve still yet to finish all of the original Holmes stories. I’m halfway finished the second Barnes and Nobel volume, and perhaps I’m hesitant to finish because that will be the end of the first canon. However, I’m also eager to finish the book. To have read all of the Holmes stories. The stories have created a passion of mine, something I truly enjoy learning everything I possibly can about. I’m actually planning to analyze the iconography of Sherlock Holmes for my senior project, and I can scarcely wait to begin my research.

So again, thank you for creating a character you would come to hate so much. He’s dearly beloved to many.


benedictcumberbatchsgirlfriend:

uhbenedict:

iM cr YinG

I’m screeching

benedictcumberbatchsgirlfriend:

uhbenedict:

iM cr YinG

I’m screeching


221beemine:

cartopathy:

221beemine:

cumberbear:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:
Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.
We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.
Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

I love this, it’s brilliant. Just want to add… the black hat, I’ve never even noticed this before but it completely blocks out every part of her head/face, you can’t even see her hair. To me it’s like a nod to the ‘real’ Mary, the assassin who we see in HLV dressed all in black with a gun to Sherlock. That’s what people do when they do bad things, they dress to disguise and hide themselves so as not to be recognisable. They’ve put her in that staple ‘bad guy’ hat (when they so easily could have had her in something lighter/less threatening) right from the very start. They’re telling us from the first second we see her that she’s not to be trusted. Just brilliant.

So good. All these little hints—even the first time I saw the promo shot of her from before S3, in her purple dress with the black jewels, I thought “what a film noir femme fatale”—the black jewelry really had an impact on character design. Imagine if she had been decked in pearls instead on the night of the engagement scene? These little touches add so much.
If I have any predictions about S4 or the Christmas special, it’s that Mary is going to be dressed in a lot of red, her other major defining color. Gray, red, that smoky purple, black—these are her mystery/assassin colors; blue is in scenes where she is strongly aligned with John (reading the blog/shaving scene; planning the wedding with John and Sherlock).

I like too that it’s the same view of her that Sherlock gets when he walks in on her in CAM’s office. It’s like, when she finally turns around in that scene, she is finally turning around in this scene to look at us. To reveal herself. But here she doesn’t turn around, because here she is still disguised. That means that Mart Morstan, the woman John married, is not in any way the real person who is here. With John she is completely disguised. We don’t see her, we don’t even see a glimpse of who she is with John.We don’t see a glimpse of who she really is until she shoots Sherlock.

Reblogging with caps for @cartopathy’s observation.

221beemine:

cartopathy:

221beemine:

cumberbear:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:

Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.

We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.

Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

I love this, it’s brilliant. Just want to add… the black hat, I’ve never even noticed this before but it completely blocks out every part of her head/face, you can’t even see her hair. To me it’s like a nod to the ‘real’ Mary, the assassin who we see in HLV dressed all in black with a gun to Sherlock. That’s what people do when they do bad things, they dress to disguise and hide themselves so as not to be recognisable. They’ve put her in that staple ‘bad guy’ hat (when they so easily could have had her in something lighter/less threatening) right from the very start. They’re telling us from the first second we see her that she’s not to be trusted. Just brilliant.

So good. All these little hints—even the first time I saw the promo shot of her from before S3, in her purple dress with the black jewels, I thought “what a film noir femme fatale”—the black jewelry really had an impact on character design. Imagine if she had been decked in pearls instead on the night of the engagement scene? These little touches add so much.

If I have any predictions about S4 or the Christmas special, it’s that Mary is going to be dressed in a lot of red, her other major defining color. Gray, red, that smoky purple, black—these are her mystery/assassin colors; blue is in scenes where she is strongly aligned with John (reading the blog/shaving scene; planning the wedding with John and Sherlock).

I like too that it’s the same view of her that Sherlock gets when he walks in on her in CAM’s office. It’s like, when she finally turns around in that scene, she is finally turning around in this scene to look at us. To reveal herself.

But here she doesn’t turn around, because here she is still disguised. That means that Mart Morstan, the woman John married, is not in any way the real person who is here.

With John she is completely disguised. We don’t see her, we don’t even see a glimpse of who she is with John.

We don’t see a glimpse of who she really is until she shoots Sherlock.

Reblogging with caps for @cartopathy’s observation.


Get to Know Me (Disney) Challenge - 4 Scenes
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